Desires Human and Divine

August 17th, 2018 Posted in writing | No Comments »

Our human desires can be out of control sometimes or directed to the wrong things. They can get us into troublewhen our wants become demands which we expect God or life or other people to fulfill.

But desires can also be good and noble. For instance, Jesustaught us to desire that the Kingdom of Heaven would come, to ask for our daily breadand prayto be kept safe from temptation. And Jesus himself expressed to the Father the desire that his disciples would be with him wherever he was.

We may think that, since God is supposed to be perfect and need nothing, God would himself have no desires.  But the truth is God has many desires (call them dreams or longings if you like) and gives voice to them in many ways.

Think of the 10 Commandments, for instance, as one way in which God says what he desires for us in our relationships with him, with the truth and with each other. The Beatitudes spoken by Jesus do the same thing. And we shouldn’t forget the times when Jesus expressed his wish that people have confidence in him and trust him with their own desires for themselves and others. Yes, God definitely has desires.

I think the sign that we are getting closer to the Kingdom of God, and it is getting closer to us, is when we discover that our desires are coming to resemble God’s more and more as time goes by. That, after all, is what we are made for and what God longs for, as well.

In the Comment section below, feel free to share what desires have led you in a good direction, and howyou tell the difference betweendesires that are good and holy and those which are not.  

Change

August 3rd, 2018 Posted in writing | No Comments »

Life is filled with endings and new beginnings. We say goodbye to summer and start a new school year, or we leave one job to take another. We change our status from “single” to “married” or move from one neighborhood (or city) to a new one. Some changes are easy and exhilarating while others are difficult and anxiety-provoking. But it seems certain that we will experience many changes, big or small, in our lives.

In my experience, it is important to have some things that provide a basis of stability as our lives change. As a life-long Christian, I have found that one of these is my conviction about the care and love God has for me no matter what changes come along. I try to strengthen this conviction by fostering a habit of personal prayer and corporate worship, and I have discovered that, with  changes that involve experiences of loss or grief, this is particularly important.

St. Ignatius of Loyola believed that we should look for God in all things, and St. Paul wrote, in chapter eight of his Letter to the Romans, that nothing will ever separate us from the love of God that comes to us through Jesus. Energized and comforted by this realization, we can live with hope and confidence no matter what changes happen in our lives.

Bearing the Cross

February 7th, 2018 Posted in Uncategorized, writing | No Comments »

Jesus says that if we wish to be his disciples we should be willing to take up our cross each day (Luke 9: 23). Many people understand this as meaning that there are some sufferings which we can’t eliminate and, if that is the case, then we need to accept them as the crosses life has given us to bear.

But the the context in which Jesus spoke was about discipleship, so I think Jesus was referring to the cross that comes as a necessary part of being a disciple. That cross comes in the form of the opposition of this world when we try to love and forgive others, comfort those who need comfort, stand up against injustice and declare God’s love towards everyone, especially those who are pushed aside and pushed down.

Jesus himself preached and practiced these things and, in so doing, brought on himself the scorn and hatred of the religious leaders of his day, which resulted in his literally carrying his cross to crucifixion and death. So we who try to be his followers should expect to endure some suffering, for the simple fact is that being a disciple does entail bearing our cross. But Jesus promises to be with us and help us carry our cross. And when the time for bearing crosses has come to an end, we will share in the reward that God the Father prepared for Jesus and which awaits those who follow him.

Preparing Advent

November 17th, 2017 Posted in writing | No Comments »

As the stores and malls blare out Christmas songs, Santa sits enthroned just off the food court amid giant stars and candy canes. With all that and more, is it any wonder that many of us forget there are four weeks of Advent before Christmas itself arrives?

In those four weeks before Christmas, Christians can ask, “What am I (what are we) waiting for?”  Where could we use a little more Jesus?  Where could we use a lot more Jesus? Where could we use more faith, more hope, more love, more patience? If we can identify what we are waiting for, we have a better chance of receiving it and appreciating it.

But the question “What am I (what are we) waiting for?” can also prod us to get active. It’s like saying, “Get a move on. Clear away the obstacles to the things you want. Make room for them in your decisions and attitudes. Stop sitting back, waiting for them to drop into your lap on December 25. Go ahead! What are you waiting for anyway?”

Before Advent begins, let’s think about which understanding fits us better this year, so that when Advent does begin in a couple of weeks we will have consciously prepared for it and, at the same time, for the Christmas season following.

Who’s the Host?

October 10th, 2017 Posted in writing | 1 Comment »

At the start of that day when Jesus called Matthew from his job as a tax collector, Matthew probably would have never guessed that when the day ended, instead of being surrounded by coins and receipts, he would be at dinner with people he might never have met before but who had also accepted Jesus’ invitation to be his followers.

Surprisingly, though, the gospel story never says where the dinner took place. It simply says that later that day Jesus and Matthew and their friends ate together, with no indication of whether the “house” was Jesus’ or Matthew’s. Certainly one of them was the host, but we don’t know which one.

Maybe our ignorance as to who hosted the dinner can remind us that in our ongoing relationship with Jesus, sometimes Jesus hosts us and sometimes we host him. Sometimes Jesus invites us into his world, welcomes us there and introduces us to his friends. At other times don’t we find ourselves inviting Jesus into our world to share our experiences and meet our friends?

We might want to take a moment as we wake up and ask who is going to be hosting the day. Will Christ invite us to enter his day or will we invite Christ to enter ours? Whichever it is, the important thing is that we and Jesus spend it together.